"RLE" was a term borrowed from Starship Troopers. The recruits all had to do 500 simulator hours in Fight School and then 1 year RLE before dropping on Klendathu. & the SOC Tribunal all carpooled to see the Starship Troopers movie and afterward called it "a farce" that "did not honor Heinlein’s legacy."

Before informed consent clinics they made you take a gender test. And you slapped a big red button for react negatively and a big blue button for react positively. And they showed you photos of all the Seinfelds rapid fire and if you slapped blue on anyone but Elaine even once it went on your Permanent Record.

pinebark:

the usual queer responses to genderqueerness in female-assigned folx and transfemale folx are both ‘so you’re not really a woman’ except in the former case the undertone is like cool, hot and in the latter it’s like i knew it, gross

If someone who’s trans fem feels queasy adopting another gender identity from the dominant binary, if they could write a zillion paragraph tumblr post about how and why they feel GQ/nonbinary/etc, if they’re thinkin about getting away from she/her and trying they or ze: I believe them and I believe that’s what feels right for them, internally, and I think they’re hot and cool.

And I’m sorry that trying to assert that identity outside of their tight circle of friends (and extended web of WWW friends) is 100% a losing proposition in terms of both navigating the cis world (where, to be clear, AFAB GQ identities are also not taken seriously and probs understood (if they’re somehow understood at all) as “some new lesbian thing”) and navigating queer/trans communities (where, to be clear, AFAB GQ identities are by no means universally respected) in which the pockets of coherence and acceptance for GQ identities that do exist will exist mainly, exclusively for AFAB folx.

And either in a binary or nonbinary identity, they’re probs gonna find that trying to participate in those spaces is so exhausting that it’s not worth trying. ‘Cause even if there are a couple cool people who wanna hang out with you, they’ve got a friend or they’ve got a partner who definitely doesn’t and definitely wants you to fuck off.

And I look forward to the hypothetical future generation of kids who were on andro blockers by Jr High and get to play with being Theys or Zes because, paradoxically, they can already exist deep stealth as cryptoAFAB. And I’ll get to read their web posts about how come no one ever thought to do this before them and I’ll be like Damn, you’re making that bowtie WORK.

pinebark:

the usual queer responses to genderqueerness in female-assigned folx and transfemale folx are both ‘so you’re not really a woman’ except in the former case the undertone is like cool, hot and in the latter it’s like i knew it, gross

Like her survival, the book is magical—and I don’t mean charming or full of glitter. (OK, maybe a little glitter.) I mean magical, as in a logic-defying story that deeply moves the reader.

VICE Magazine on Sybil Lamb’s I’VE GOT A TIME BOMB 

Buy your copy of I’ve Got A Time Bomb here

(via topsidepress)

(via pathofnowandforever)

leger:

I don’t know if this image is really intelligible to anyone besides us, but about a month ago, Riley MacLeod and Cat Fitzpatrick and I sat down to have the first of many discussions about how we imagine the future of Topside Press, how to realize that future, and—most importantly—how Topside might fit into larger movements that will bring the world we live in closer to the world we want to live in.After several hours, we ended up with this crudely drawn graphic, a theory of change as a cycle of Inspire-Gather-Develop-Distribute. The line in the middle separates the part of the cycle we can directly contribute to (the bottom) and the part that happens in other places that we might be able to encourage, but a lot of which happens far outside of our view (inspire-gather).We’re so passionate about books because we think great literature inspires great ideas and brings people together—and people coming together is the only thing that ever makes substantive change. Of course, after the gather phase, a whole new set of creative ideas are generated, developed and distributed, which then sparks a whole new cycle of change.Wacky, eh?
So basically our job as editors and publishers is to hang out, submerged, under the watermill, pushing it as hard as we can. For us, it means workshopping with authors, helping them make their books the best they can be, turning them into physical (or electronic) books, and getting them out into the world in as many places as we can. And we have this crazy idea that if we just push hard enough on the part of the wheel we can touch, that it will help the wheel keep turning faster and faster.
It might look like we’re in the book business, but we’re not—we’re using the book business; it is a tool that we happen to know how to operate. (It’s part of the reason our books are available everywhere, including The Pirate Bay)
It’s a wondrous thing watching the wheel turn, even from our tiny place on it. Imogen came to us with the initial Nevada manuscript back in 2011, and we worked with her on it a lot in 2012, and before it even came out in April 2013 it was already evident that it was a change-maker. The way that this one slim novel inspires people and brings them together and *changes* things is so significant it is hard to believe, but magnificent to watch.
In so many ways, it changed the landscape for writers. Casey Plett’s remarkable book of short stories A Safe Girl to Love is something I can’t imagine existing in a time before Nevada. A Safe Girl to Love reaches so much further, assumes a whole different universe than Nevada can imagine.
My favorite story in A Safe Girl To Love is “Winning,” one of the last ones. It’s about a young trans woman who goes home to help her mother—also a trans woman—pack up her childhood home in preparation for a move. Even imaging that world—in life or in literature—was so startling when I first encountered it. Wouldn’t it be heaven if your mother understood you, really understood you? “Winning” offers us this promise, this beacon; a lighthouse on the horizon.Of course, Casey Plett is way too good to let us off that easy, and the mother-daughter relationship is fraught with the pain and history and scars that none of us can out run. Reading “Winning” is watching the sails slowly sink below the horizon. The way that these two women try and fail and try again is so hopeful and also…forces us to really reckon with the way that this violence tears us all apart. That we love at all, that we succeed ever, is against all odds. That no matter how much we value one another, our failures in love are the failures of the world to value our love, and we are just these lonely motherfuckers, forever beating back an ocean of indifference.
And so now we push push push the wheel. Readers started getting A Safe Girl to Love in June, and next month Casey Plett and Sybil Lamb embark on a 40+ city tour of the US and Canada to be a part of the “inspire” and “gather” segments. In all those cities, they’ll be reading with as many other writers as we can muster, and if you’re a trans woman writer, you’re automatically 100% invited to show up and join the reading, share your work, and push.
Tour dates are going to start getting announced on Monday, though initial info is on our tour page here and we’re still looking for local folks in Calgary, Saskatoon, Phoenix, Albuquerque, Athens, and anywhere in Ohio, so email cat@topsidepress.com if you’re interested in getting involved.
Find out more about A Safe Girl To Love or Casey Plett

leger:

I don’t know if this image is really intelligible to anyone besides us, but about a month ago, Riley MacLeod and Cat Fitzpatrick and I sat down to have the first of many discussions about how we imagine the future of Topside Press, how to realize that future, and—most importantly—how Topside might fit into larger movements that will bring the world we live in closer to the world we want to live in.

After several hours, we ended up with this crudely drawn graphic, a theory of change as a cycle of Inspire-Gather-Develop-Distribute. The line in the middle separates the part of the cycle we can directly contribute to (the bottom) and the part that happens in other places that we might be able to encourage, but a lot of which happens far outside of our view (inspire-gather).

We’re so passionate about books because we think great literature inspires great ideas and brings people together—and people coming together is the only thing that ever makes substantive change. Of course, after the gather phase, a whole new set of creative ideas are generated, developed and distributed, which then sparks a whole new cycle of change.

Wacky, eh?

So basically our job as editors and publishers is to hang out, submerged, under the watermill, pushing it as hard as we can. For us, it means workshopping with authors, helping them make their books the best they can be, turning them into physical (or electronic) books, and getting them out into the world in as many places as we can. And we have this crazy idea that if we just push hard enough on the part of the wheel we can touch, that it will help the wheel keep turning faster and faster.

It might look like we’re in the book business, but we’re not—we’re using the book business; it is a tool that we happen to know how to operate. (It’s part of the reason our books are available everywhere, including The Pirate Bay)

It’s a wondrous thing watching the wheel turn, even from our tiny place on it. Imogen came to us with the initial Nevada manuscript back in 2011, and we worked with her on it a lot in 2012, and before it even came out in April 2013 it was already evident that it was a change-maker. The way that this one slim novel inspires people and brings them together and *changes* things is so significant it is hard to believe, but magnificent to watch.

In so many ways, it changed the landscape for writers. Casey Plett’s remarkable book of short stories A Safe Girl to Love is something I can’t imagine existing in a time before Nevada. A Safe Girl to Love reaches so much further, assumes a whole different universe than Nevada can imagine.

My favorite story in A Safe Girl To Love is “Winning,” one of the last ones. It’s about a young trans woman who goes home to help her mother—also a trans woman—pack up her childhood home in preparation for a move. Even imaging that world—in life or in literature—was so startling when I first encountered it. Wouldn’t it be heaven if your mother understood you, really understood you? “Winning” offers us this promise, this beacon; a lighthouse on the horizon.

Of course, Casey Plett is way too good to let us off that easy, and the mother-daughter relationship is fraught with the pain and history and scars that none of us can out run. Reading “Winning” is watching the sails slowly sink below the horizon. The way that these two women try and fail and try again is so hopeful and also…forces us to really reckon with the way that this violence tears us all apart. That we love at all, that we succeed ever, is against all odds. That no matter how much we value one another, our failures in love are the failures of the world to value our love, and we are just these lonely motherfuckers, forever beating back an ocean of indifference.

And so now we push push push the wheel. Readers started getting A Safe Girl to Love in June, and next month Casey Plett and Sybil Lamb embark on a 40+ city tour of the US and Canada to be a part of the “inspire” and “gather” segments. In all those cities, they’ll be reading with as many other writers as we can muster, and if you’re a trans woman writer, you’re automatically 100% invited to show up and join the reading, share your work, and push.

Tour dates are going to start getting announced on Monday, though initial info is on our tour page here and we’re still looking for local folks in Calgary, Saskatoon, Phoenix, Albuquerque, Athens, and anywhere in Ohio, so email cat@topsidepress.com if you’re interested in getting involved.

Find out more about A Safe Girl To Love or Casey Plett

leger:

Since we got author photos for Casey Plett today, I was reminded that we didn’t have any for Sybil yet. When I asked her if she had a headshot, these are the photos she sent me. 

Which one do you think makes the best headshot?

topsidepress:

Sybil Lamb’s micro-zine from 2006 Tranny Summer Camp Blood Feast

brb putting Sybil in a room until she writes a graphic novel